Twenty ideas for the gift-giving season

Twenty ideas for the gift-giving season
Whether you love it or hate it, the gift-giving season is here. And the Washington Native Plant Society is here to help. You can give your sweetheart, pal, family member, friend, co-worker, spouse, in-law, or even yourself, one of these fine WNPS-themed gifts: 1. A WNPS membership and all the stuff that it includes: the quarterly journal, Douglasia , chapter newsletters, programs, field trips, and much more. It's easy to sign up online and there are membership categories for any budget. 2. The W...
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Plant Profile: Snow Buckwheat (Eriogonum niveum)

Plant Profile: Snow Buckwheat (Eriogonum niveum)
Autumn is coming, and the number of plants still flowering diminishes this time of year. Snow Buckwheat (Eriogonum niveum) is one you can often find in bloom through September in eastern Washington. This plant profile was originally published, in slightly different form, as part of a native plant spotlight series.   Why Choose It? With frosty-green leaves and long-lasting sprays of tiny white to pink flowers, Snow Buckwheat cools the eye in late summer and early fall. Happy on little water,...
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Goodbye Sarah Reichard, and “Where Do We Go From Here?”

Goodbye Sarah Reichard, and “Where Do We Go From Here?”
I was stunned to learn that Dr. Sarah Reichard passed away in her sleep in late August while leading a UW Botanic Gardens tour in South Africa. I first met Sarah in 1981, when she was an undergraduate in Botany at the same time I was earning my Masters at the University of Washington. I saw her most recently at the memorial service for Dr. Art Kruckeberg , where we shared memories of Art. We chatted about my recent trip to the Chelsea Flower Show in London and her then-upcoming trip to South Afr...
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A Great Fall Berry from The Forest: Blue Elderberry

A Great Fall Berry from The Forest: Blue Elderberry
Blue elderberry is one of the great plants of the Pacific Northwest forest. I have found this berry in nearly every county of Washington State. It grows in wet, cool shady areas. It produces great berries that are prized for their flavor by both humans and wildlife. Native people have used it for as a medicinal plant and to make small flutes or whistles from its stems. Sambucus nigra ssp. caerulea (formerly Sambucus caerulea ), the scientific name for the blue elderberry, is different from the S...
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Tussling with Tussilago

Tussling with Tussilago
In late April of 2016, Kristyn Loving noticed some unusual plants by the side of a road in Mt.Rainier National Park. As one of the park's communication's staff, she is always looking for new stories—and incidentally, new plants. No one in the park offices was familiar with the plants she'd found. But two Mt. Rainier volunteers, Crow Vecchio and Carol Miltimore , who have each racked up impressive volunteer credentials at the park, are also PNW IPC EDRR Citizen Scientists . That mouthful stands f...
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In the field with Art Kruckeberg

In the field with Art Kruckeberg
Art Kruckeberg, one of the founders of the Washington Native Plant Society, passed away on May 25, 2016, age 96. He was a grand old man of Washington botany, a mentor, and a mensch. Formal obituaries may be found in the Seattle Times and on the University of Washington Biology web page. What follows is an appreciation of Art that I wrote for the Washington Native Plant Society journal Douglasia in 2000. The faithful and the newly converted gathered to hear the gospel of serpentine from one of th...
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Our Stinging Nettles

Our Stinging Nettles
Nettles are in a very small family Nettles are in a very small family, Urticaceae, most of whose members have stings. Washington's native nettle is Urtica dioica . Nettle leaves' stinging is accomplished with hollow hairs, like microscopic hypodermic needles, which exude formic acid when brushed against. An irritating rash may appear on one's skin, its severity depending on the sensitivity of the "victim." Some people have red, burning sores for days. Some people say they don't feel a thing! And...
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Maytime

Maytime
Maytime is… A completely over-the-top movie musical from 1937, starring Jeanette Macdonald and Nelson Eddy A single, deep red Paeonia hybrid with golden stamens A time when plant lovers in the northern hemisphere shift into high gear All of the above And the correct answer is 4–all of the above! Here are several items for your consideration during this blooming busy time: More color Invasive procedures What do you want to learn? More color I hope you enjoyed the Celebrating Wildflowers coloring ...
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A Cavalcade of Coloring

A Cavalcade of Coloring
In bookstores these days, I see masses of coloring books marketed to adults. People are snapping them up, I understand, for stress relief, for mindfulness, for a creative outlet. This brought to mind a treasure trove of coloring book pages prepared by the late Karl Urban (1943-1999), who was a botanist on the Umatilla National Forest in Oregon. Karl Urban prepared these northwestern United States wildflower illustrations for Celebrating Wildflowers and other educational activities (Celebrating W...
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Big Trees, Big Hearts, and GiveBIG

Big Trees, Big Hearts, and GiveBIG
Give BIG Let's start with GiveBIG . Tuesday, May 3– and now extended through Wednesday, May 4 –is the Seattle Foundation's GiveBIG event. The Foundation sponsors this online giving event to inspire you and others to give generously to nonprofits in our region—and the Foundation stretches your donation by adding money of its own. Make an impact—your spring contribution to the Washington Native Plant Society will be made even more valuable by stre-e-e-tch dollars available from the Seattle Foundat...
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Join the Celebration: Native Plant Appreciation Week 2016

Join the Celebration: Native Plant Appreciation Week 2016
Governor Jay Inslee has proclaimed April 24 through May 1, 2016 to be Native Plant Appreciation Week across Washington State—and you're invited to help the Washington Native Plant Society celebrate. The Washington Native Plant Society is 40 years old this year, and it's Washington's 12 th year of celebrating our flora with Native Plant Appreciation Week. Take a trip I've been traveling across Washington for work lately, and botanizing from behind the wheel (safely, of course). It's been my pleas...
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The Poetry of Botanical Foolishness

The Poetry of Botanical Foolishness
By a lucky coincidence, April Fools Day always kicks off National Poetry Month . And Botanical Rambles is celebrating this year with a small collection of botanical foolishness. Spring has sprung, and we're getting down to the serious business of the enjoying and learning about Washington's flora during the growing season. Two recent Rambles ( here and here ) provide information on numerous opportunities. But this post celebrates three writers whose botanical foolishness has delighted generation...
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Dates to Remember: Botanical Activities Abound!

Dates to Remember: Botanical Activities Abound!
Cue the overwhelm. The spring rush is upon us. Washington Native Plant Society activities Opportunities from other organizations Washington Native Plant Society Activities April 1, 2016 No fooling, applications for the South Sound Native Plant Stewardship Training are due April 1! The Washington Native Plant Society (WNPS) and its South Sound Chapter are offering a Native Plant Stewardship Program for Pierce and Thurston Counties in Spring 2016. The six-week, no-cost program combines classroom l...
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Plant Profile: Red-Flowering Currant (Ribes sanguineum)

Plant Profile: Red-Flowering Currant (Ribes sanguineum)
I have several white-flowered bushes of Ribes sanguineum in my garden, and when they burst into bloom they cause a number of trite similes to come to mind. Their abundance is like a frothy cascade, a bridal veil, a waterfall…you get the idea. My shrubs came from a start supplied to me by Dr. Eugene Kozloff , well-known as a zoologist and author—and less well-known as a chronic plant propagator and generous plant dispenser. They bloom earlier in my garden than the red cultivars, and the hummingbi...
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January 2016 News and Notes from WNPS

January 2016 News and Notes from WNPS
Botanical Rambles wishes you a happy new year and offers you this capacious—but nowhere near exhaustive—list of things to do and learn. Contents Washington Native Plant Society News Kudos! WNPS Chapter News WNPS Chapter Activities Conservation—Opportunity to comment Trainings Volunteer Opportunities Grant Opportunities Plant Sales Washington Native Plant Society News The WNPS Office Welcomes Visitors. Located in Seattle's Magnuson Park, the office is generally staffed Monday–Thursday, 9:00am to ...
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